Senior Prizegiving

Senior School Prize winners 2016

Lower School Prizegiving

The winners of the 2015-16 Third Year prizes have been announced. Many congratulations to this year’s recipients:

Lower School Prize Winners 2016

Third Year Prizegiving

HAM_384The winners of the 2015-16 Third Year prizes have been announced. Many congratulations to this year’s recipients:

Third Year Prize Winners 2016

 

Lower School Prizes

Hodges Memorial Mathematics Prize

Arthur W. Hodges taught Mathematics at Hampton School from 1947 until his untimely death in service, a few days before his planned retirement in 1974. He was a colleague known for his integrity, thoroughness and patient understanding of his pupils, who also found time to be Principal of the Thames Valley Evening Institute of Education. He was for many years a first year form tutor.

The Hodges Memorial Mathematics Prize is presented to the First Year pupil who has gained the highest score by a Hampton student in the National Junior Maths Challenge, and who has shown over the year a consistently high overall mathematical ability.

The Warren Prize for Sustained Progress

This prize has been endowed by an Old Hamptonian, Bob Warren (1952-9), and is awarded to the Second Year boy who has shown the greatest academic improvement over the year. He writes that it is often the case that the academic high flyers are given accolades, but those who did not initially make the top echelon may, over the years, have worked extremely hard to improve their performance after a less confident start, yet seldom receive any public acknowledgement for this achievement. It was his wish that we award such a prize.

The Montague Prize for Biology

David Montague taught Biology at Hampton for many years and on leaving wished this prize to be awarded to the First Year boy who was judged to have produced the best Biology project at the end of the year.

Hampton School Music Society Lower School Cup

Sponsored by the Music Society, this prize is awarded for service to the Music Department. The recipient will have made a significant contribution, both in academic music and as a performer in ensembles and choirs. They will also have gone above and beyond the normal expectations in helping and participating. The intention is that this should go to a boy in the First, Second or Third Year.

Third Year Prizes

Mistresses Prize

At the end of the Second World War, the Hampton masters who had been on active service returned to their posts here, and the women who had deputised for them subscribed to found a commemorative prize which has ever since been known as the Mistresses’ Prize. They asked that it should be awarded each year to the Third Former who had achieved the greatest academic distinction.

Harris Prize for Endeavour

Donated by Colonel Kenneth Harris, Old Hamptonian. It is awarded to the boy in the Third Year who has impressed the staff by showing exceptional courage and determination.

Tutors’ Prizes

These are awarded by Form Tutors to boys, who have not only achieved commendably, but have made a significant contribution to the wider life of the School.

Form Prizes

These are awarded to boys who have demonstrated particular academic achievement throughout the year.

Headmaster’s Merit Prizes

These are awarded to the boys in the year who have collected the most merits. Merits are awarded for an excellent piece of work or for a praiseworthy act in any area of School life.

Head of Year Prizes

Each year, the Heads of Third Year present prizes to those boys who have made an outstanding contribution to the wider life of the School

Parents’ Association Original Work Prize

Sponsored by the Parents’ Association, this prize is awarded to the student that has produced an exceptional piece of original work, either as part of their core curriculum studies or beyond them.

Original Work Prizes

These are awarded to the runners up for the Parents’ Association Original Work Prize

Parents’ Association Art Award

Sponsored by the Parents’ Association, this prize is awarded to the student that has produced an exceptional piece of original work in the field of Art.

Prizes for contribution to School Sport

These are awarded to two boys in each mainstream sport, one for the Third Year boy that has shown outstanding commitment in his chosen sport and one for the most improved Third Year boy in his chosen sport.

HELP (Hampton Extended Learning Programme) Project Prizes

These are awarded to those boys that have demonstrated outstanding independent work skills through the completion of a substantial piece of project work outside the taught curriculum.

Chess Prize

This is awarded to the Third Year boy that has demonstrated outstanding commitment to School Chess.

Music Prize

This is awarded to the Third Year boy that has demonstrated outstanding commitment to School Music, through extensive co-curricular contributions.

Senior School Prizes

Howes Cup

It is awarded to the runners up for the Fitzwygram Prize (q.v.) in recognition of their outstanding contribution to the School.

Fitzwygram Prize

Rev Fitzroy John Fitzwygram was appointed the first vicar of the new parish of St James Hampton Hill, established in 1863. This was necessary with the growth of the old parish of Hampton based at St Mary’s, the original site of Hampton School. Fitzwygram was a significant influence in the development of the new area, working for the elimination of substandard housing and the improvement of the prospects of the poor of the parish. He founded schools in the area for infants and girls as well as for boys.

The Fitzwygram Prize is the most prestigious one at Hampton and is awarded to the outstanding upper-sixth former for his contribution to the school, normally, but not exclusively, to the outgoing School Captain.

Tutors’ Prizes are awarded by Form Tutors to boys, who have not only achieved commendably, but have made a significant contribution to the wider life of the School.

Form Prizes are awarded to boys who have demonstrated particular academic achievement throughout the year.

Headmaster’s Merit Prizes are awarded to the boys in the year who have collected most merits. Merits are awarded for an excellent piece of work or for a praiseworthy act in any area of School life.

The Academic Attainment Prize is given to the student who produces the best overall results in his end of year exams.

The Academic Achievement Prize is given to one of the highest performing boys, who has demonstrated particular progress in their studies.

The Parents’ Association Art Award is an exchange rather than an award. The winner receives a cheque to spend on art materials, and he in turn presents to us a piece of art-work to be displayed in the school. This year it is awarded to Simon Hamlyn.

Hampton School Music Society Upper School Cup

Sponsored by the Music Society, this prize is awarded for service to the Music Department. The recipient will have made a significant contribution, both in academic music and as a performer in ensembles and choirs. They will also have gone above and beyond the normal expectations in helping and participating.The intention is that this should go to a boy in the Fourth Year or above.

Steffens Prize for Mathematics

Frank Steffens was a pupil at Hampton Grammar School from 1918 and Head Boy between 1924 and 1926. He played Cricket for the 1st XI. After university and posts at St. Marylebone Grammar School and the Judd School he returned to Hampton in 1934 to teach Mathematics for the rest of his career. He was a founder member (with Stan Barton) of the School ATC contingent which later changed into the CCF. He was Head of Careers from 1963 and retired in 1972.
The prize is awarded to the best results by a Fourth Year boy taking IGCSE Mathematics a year early.

Everett Prize for Chemistry

Douglas Everett CBE, FRS was an Old Hamptonian (School Captain 1935) who became the Leverhulme Professor of Chemistry at Bristol University. It is his school boxing blazer that is on display in the School archive cabinet on the ground floor. The prize is awarded to the best Chemistry student in the Fifth Year.

Lee Prize for Physics

Given by Joan Lee in memory of her husband – a former governor of Hampton School . It is for the year’s best Physics student at GCSE.

Mackenzie Prize for Art

Vic Mackenzie, Head of Art at Hampton School, joined the school in 1946 and retired in 1972. As a young man he had represented the Isle of Wight in Cricket, Rugby and Hockey, and went on to represent Leicestershire in Hockey. He was also a Wimbledon tennis coach. His enthusiasms in art were centred around figure drawing, printing, and theatre designing. The prize is awarded in his memory to the most promising student of Art in the Lower Sixth Year.

Neil White Prize for Biology

Neil White (with his brother Ian) was a pupil at Hampton School and a keen Biologist, sportsman and member of the CCF. After his degree at Oxford, he went on to Birmingham University where he was nearing the completion his doctorate at the Institute of Cancer Studies when he was tragically killed, knocked down by a drunken driver. The prize was endowed by his family in his honour and in gratitude for the part Hampton played in his life.

Healy Prize for Chemistry

The prize is named after Dr A.T. Healy, an Old Hamptonian who made a generous bequest to the school which facilitated the rebuilding of new science facilities, and after whom the Healy Chemistry Laboratory was named. It goes to the best Chemistry student of the Lower Sixth Year.

W.F. Darke Prize for Economics

W.F. Darke attended Hampton Grammar School from 1923-1930. He was School Captain in 1929-30 and the winner of the Fitzwygram Prize in 1930.

W.D. James Prize for English Literature

W.D. James was Head of English at Hampton and later founded Denmead School. The prize is awarded to the best student studying English Literature in the Lower Sixth Year.

Garside Prize for History

Bernard Garside was an eminent historian and Head of History at Hampton, retiring in 1960. He was a greatly respected worker in the field of local history. He was the author of the History of Hampton School. He made a generous bequest to the school during the 1980s, from which this prize is funded. The Prize is awarded in his honour to the best student in History in the Lower Sixth Year.

Windust Memorial Mathematical Prize

W.H.Windust was Head of Mathematics at Hampton School until his retirement in 1932. He was succeeded by Stan Barton. The prize is awarded to the top Mathematician in the Lower Sixth Year.

Deere Prize for Physics

Malcolm Deere was an Old Hamptonian and governor of the School. He was the Deputy Chief Executive of UCAS. The prize is awarded to the best Physics student in the Lower Sixth Year.

Morris Cup

Les Morris worked for many tears in the Combined Cadet Force and was a loved and dedicated colleague. He had served in the RAF during WWII and after the war went into teaching what we now call Design Technology. He came to Hampton to run the CCF commissariat. On retirement he donated the prize to be awarded annually to the cadet who gave exceptional selfless service to the Corps.

Wood Cup

Awarded to the outstanding Army section senior NCO of the year.

Manders Cup

Dr. H.R. Manders taught Physics at Hampton until May 1941, when he was called up to serve as a regular officer, having been on the Reserve List (along with other members of Staff) since 1939. He had served in the Home Guard in Twickenham and had been an active (and accurate) member of the Hampton Grammar School Rifle Club, gaining the NRA Bronze award. He was instrumental in the foundation of the Air Training Corps Unit (651 Flight) at the School in February 1941 and became its first Officer Commanding. On leaving Hampton he presented a cup to the School. It is awarded to the outstanding RAF section senior NCO of the year.

Stapleton Prize

Wing Commander W. Stapleton OBE was a pupil at Hampton School from 1931 to December 1936. He has had a distinguished career in the RAF. He served as personal staff officer to another Old Hamptonian, Air Vice-Marshal Pankhurst, Director General of Personnel, RAF. He donated the Prize in 1955, as an annual award to the cadet displaying the highest qualities of leadership. It is presented to the outstanding senior cadet in the CCF contingent.

Milford Tennis Trophy

Donated by Andrew Milford, pupil at the School 1980-4. Andrew was the captain of the 1st VI 1982-4. The trophy is awarded to the best junior player.

Newman Tennis Trophy

Graeme (“Eggy”) Newman, Hampton pupil1971-7, played in the 1st VI tennis team. After he left Hampton he was killed in a car accident in the early 1980s. The trophy was donated by his parents in his memory.

Tozzi Colts Cricket Cup

Edward Tozzi was a pupil at Hampton and was an outstanding member of the Colts cricket team in the Fourth Year. Tragically, he suffered a heart attack and died at the school gates on 14 May 1955. The prize was presented by grandparents in 1956 in his honour and goes to the outstanding cricketer in the Fourth Year.

Thornton Cricket Cup

Awarded to the outstanding senior First XI player.

Bullen Rowing Trophy

The trophy is awarded to best overall performer in the First Eight.

Barton Sculling Trophy

Stan Barton joined Hampton Grammar School in 1929 from St Olaf’s School as a teacher of Mathematics. In 1932 he became Head of Mathematics to replace W.H. Windust. In 1940 he helped found the ATC contingent which he ran until 1952 when it changed into the CCF. He was a continuing force in running the new Contingent. He was appointed Deputy Head in 1955 and acted as Headmaster in 1970 during the interregnum. In 1956 he was responsible for the founding and development of the Boat Club. He retired in 1972 having been a crucial element in the successful development of so many aspects of the School. The School is still very much in his debt.

The trophy is awarded to a Senior rower who has shown outstanding commitment to Boat Club.

Rod Nimmons Cup

The Cup is awarded to the most improved J15 rower of the year

Brian May Cup & Prize

Brian May, Old Hamptonian, is a musician and instrumentalist of world renown, possibly best known as a member of the band Queen. His son also attended the school. The prize is awarded to the sixth-former chosen by the Technology or Physics Department as the outstanding innovator of the year.

Neville Smith Music Prize

N.S. Smith was a pupil at Hampton 1933-1939. This prize is awarded to recognise an outstanding contribution to school music.

Gavin Alexander Memorial Prize

Gavin Alexander was the distinguished headmaster appointed in 1969, who took the School to independence in 1975 and was so influential in establishing the ethos and the academic prestige of the School. Music was deeply important to him and the prize is awarded to the outstanding musical performance of the year and contribution to school music.

P.G.Wake Geography Prize

P.G. Wake was a Geography teacher at Hampton and an officer in CCF. He retired from Hampton during the 1960s.This prize is awarded to the best Geography student in the Lower Sixth Year

Hobbs Geography Prize

John Hobbs was Head of Geography at Hampton until 1973 when he retired after a long and distinguished career. This prize was instituted for the outstanding piece of Fieldwork done after the residential course at Slapton Field Study Centre. It is now presented to the student who gives the best Geographical presentation.

Simms-Trenter Prize

Pauline Simms and Isolde Trenter were the mainstays of the German Department at Hampton for many years. They had a close relationship with the school which continues after their retirements. They offered this prize for outstanding work in A Level German.

David Swarbrigg Prize

David Swarbrigg was Head of Religious Studies, Chaplain and counsellor at Hampton School and was a major influence in developing the pastoral care system. He still maintains contact with the School and is a chaplain at the Chapel Royal Hampton Court. He presented this prize to encourage and reward progress in Philosophy or Theology. It is awarded to the student whom the RS Department judge as having made the best or most significant progress over the year.

Woodriff Cup

Awarded by Cllr Brian Woodriff, an ex governor of the school and a lifelong student of Russian, who devoted much time to fostering links between the Borough of Richmond upon Thames and educational institutes in Russia.

Grundy Prize

Stan Grundy was a major industrialist, Old Hamptonian and Governor of the School. He was a major sponsor of the Technology building named after him, and wished to promote interest in industry and commerce among the boys. The prize is for the best report written by a fifth year boy on their period of work shadowing – a scheme run by the Careers Department after GCSE to give boys the chance to have personal experience the world of work (outside school!).

Quesnel Prize for the spoken word

R.L.Quesnel was School Captain 1950-1 and was the winner of the Fitzwygram Prize in 1951. The prize awarded in his name to the student who has done most to develop the art and practice of debating within the school.

Old Hamptonians’ Masonic Lodge Prize for Social Service

The School has for a long time regarded that service to the local community is an essential part of the education of its students. This prize, provided by the Old Hamptonian Masonic Lodge, originally was awarded annually for the best essay on the history of the School, but during the headmastership of George Whitfield it was re-designated to the senior student who has, in the judgement of the staff, contributed most effectively to the running of the Community Service programme.

Dennis King Cup

Dennis King (D.G. “Digger” King) was a pupil at the school, and School Captain 1939-40. He was killed on his way to service in the Sudan when the troop-ship S.S. Ceramic was sunk by enemy action in December 1942. The cup was presented to the School by his parents, Mr & Mrs G.R. King, in his memory.

It is awarded to the sixth former who has devoted much time and effort to helping the school in essential (but often unglamorous) duties which he has performed with loyalty, modesty and efficiency.

The Page Prize

The Page Prize, so named at its institution by an anonymous benefactor, is awarded each year for the best translation by a member of the LVIth of a passage of Latin verse. The passage is set from an author or work not normally read at school level and translations are judged by members of the Classics Department and an invited external, different each year and usually a prominent university academic. Winning entries are published in The Lion.